Chech Republic

Sitting in the centre of Europe, with Germany to the west, Poland to the north, Slovakia to the east and Austria in the south, Czechia, the former Czech Republic, has one foot in Western Europe, and one in the Slavic East.



Chech Republic, Travel Guide

“Prague never lets you go”, said Franz Kafka, “this dear little mother has claws”. Prague gets her golden claws into tourists too, and few ever make it outside the capital. But those who tear themselves away won’t be sorry; the honey-coloured spa towns in the Sudeten Mountains, Bohemia’s Renaissance breweries and hilltop ruins, and the tumbling vineyards and underground bars of Moravia are well worth exploring.

Before the fall of Communism, a staggering ninety percent of foreign tourists visiting the country never strayed from the environs of the capital, Prague. While that no longer holds true, Prague is still the main focus of most people’s trips to Czechia, certainly English-speaking tourists.

Although the country is small, the variety in landscape and architecture is enormous, encompassing the forests and rolling countryside of Bohemia, peaceful spa towns like Karlovy Vary, Moravia’s spectacular karst region and historic towns like Olomouc and Český Krumlov.

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“Prague, Chech Republic Travel Guide”

Everyone who visits the Czech Republic starts with Prague, the cradle of Czech culture and one of Europe’s most fascinating cities. Prague offers a near-intact medieval core of Gothic architecture that can transport you back 500 years – the 14th-century Charles Bridge, connecting two historic neighbourhoods across the Vltava River, with the castle ramparts and the spires of St Vitus Cathedral rising above, is one of the classic sights of world travel. But the city is not just about history; it’s a vital urban centre with a rich array of cultural offerings, and a newly emerging foodie scene.

The Czech Republic’s location in the middle of Europe has seen a long history of raiding tribes, conquering armies and triumphant dynasties. This turbulent past has left a legacy of hundreds of castles and chateaux – everywhere you look there seems to be a many-turreted fortress perched above a town, or a romantic summer palace lazing peacefully amid manicured parkland. The number and variety of Czech castles is simply awe-inspiring – everything from grim Gothic ruins clinging to a dizzy pinnacle of rock, to majestic, baroque mansions filled with the finest furniture that Europe’s artisans could provide.

See Also: Pelhrimov, Travel Guide

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